Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Losing one glove...


'Losing one glove is certainly painful,
but nothing compared to the pain
of losing one glove, throwing away the other,
and finding the first one again' (Piet Hein)

Well, this posting is not about gloves, nor about Piet Hein, but about something I had thought lost long ago.  Fossicking through my accumulated Wargames bits of paper, I discovered, to my joy, this!


Cover page set up for my ACW rule set.
The name 'Bluebellies and Greybacks'
was added later.


This was to be the cover page for my hand written rule set (still attached: nine leaves of foolscap. both sides, and with marginal notes and amendments).  But it was this picture that I missed most (dated early 1989 - 26 years ago).  

From four years more recent (i.e. 1992), the following is part of a map that was to be used for a 'Second American Civil War' set in the state of Tennessee.  This was a multi-player thing, and several actions were fought, with varying results.  But I did make two very bad mistakes with the thing. First, I wanted to play as well as run it.  That's OK for a two or three player game, but we had more participants here. It didn't really work.   The other was that I allowed the thing to begin before I was quite ready.  In the event, the largest armies met, I think at Shelbyville and the campaign bogged down.  After a bit of a contretemps with one of the players for reasons I no longer recall I got fed up with the thing and closed it down.


Page 1 of my 6-page map of Tennessee, the theatre
of the Second American Civil War.

But I kept the map!


The idea was that after the disaster to Schofield's Corps at Spring Hill and Thomas's Army subsequently at Franklin, the Federal election campaign, which had seemed to be favouring Abraham Lincoln, turned sharply in favour of his rival Gen. McClellan.  The increasingly bitter campaign was fought out amid a storm of criticism of the President and his favourite generals.  After one of the most closely contested elections in all American history, McClellan was sworn into Office in January 1865.  By this time an armistice had already been signed, and hostilities suspended.

Heated attitudes remained, however.  Apart from the slavery issue remaining unresolved and an even sorer point than before, there was the matter of the territorial settlement.  The Confederacy insisted upon the return of Missouri, North Arkansas,  East and West Tennessee, West Virginia, and added, rather gratuitously, a demand for New Mexico,  Kentucky and Maryland as well.  That was far beyond the price for Peace even President McClellan was prepared to pay; much less would he for a moment entertain the idea of 'returning contrabands' that the Jeff Davis led government was arrogant and naive enough to insert into their list of demands.  



Generals Lee and Cleburne led the CS Army's warnings that the talks would fail in the face of Davis's uncompromising attitude.  They expressed no surprise at all when the Union armies refused, pending a Treaty ratified by Congress, to yield one inch from the advanced they had reached by the War's end. Lee resigned in disgust; Cleburne accepted with relief a posting in Galveston, Tx; other well-known generals also found expression of their distaste for a renewal of hostilities in various ways. Never known for his patience, Davis nevertheless began rebuilding the Army of Tennessee.  Negotiations having stalled by the end of February, 1865, Richmond severed relations with Washington a month later.  

On 1 April 1865, the Army of Tennessee left its Mississippi and Georgian cantonments, and marched north.  The Second Civil War had begun.





16 comments:

  1. Certainly a fine cover. I'm always intrigued by these personal artifacts.

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    1. I had been very much regretting its disappearance, as I thought, for good. I have some other, similar artifacts that I'll publish one of these days. In fact I was looking for something else (in the ACW line) at the time!

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  2. Ion,

    I found a handwritten copy (your writing) of your ACW rules. I was going to try and pop around Friday or Saturday as I just got back from travelling.

    Cheers

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    1. Another one! I didn't know there were two! Yep: drop round any time. I've had a look at the Regimental Fire and Fury, by the way. We could give them a try with our armies.

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    2. ... Turns out I'll be out Friday night. Saturd arvo or evening would be fine.

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    3. Ok I'll sort myself out for Sat. Cheers

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  3. I too have what you call "accumulated bits of wargames paper". I call it my rules cupboard. It consists of piles and piles of rule "books" accumulated over the years before the age of professionally printed rules. Most are hand typed, hand written or even even shock horror roneo stencilled. They mostly date from the time when every wargamer played with his own set of rules and would happily toss you a copy after a casual enquiry at their gaming table. They like my now very timeworn copies of wargamers newsletter are an absolute mine of great ideas and inspiration.

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    1. I have a bit of a collection of that type, myself, to go with my ideas for games of various periods. I have to confess to a certain war games dilettantism. There also ideas for battles and campaigns, and a whole swodge of battle maps of past victories (and the very occasional defeat).

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  4. Good find...and nice to see the see use of the word "fossicking".

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    1. Great word, 'fossick'. More accurate than 'tidying up'. :-)

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  5. Now, I have to hunt through my files. My best friend and gaming buddy during the 70s came up with a bunch of home made rules, one of which was based on AH 1st edition Gettysburg and the other on Midway.

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    1. Those board games could prove a gold mine for War games ideas. My ACW rule set owed a good deal to the SPI 'Terrible Swift Sword' game system and the AH 'Wizard's Quest', among other things.

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  6. Prior to 1937, Presidential Inaugurations took place on March 4th, the anniversary of when the constitution came into effect, March 4th, 1789. I suspect, had Lincoln lost, Grant would have prosecuted a winter campaign against Lee to beat him before the deadline.

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    1. you are probably right about that. Though it usual to suspend action on matter of fundamental difference (in this case war or peace) in the interim, Lincoln might well have continued to adhere to his 'preservation of the Union' policy as longh as he could, and I have no doubt Grant, and especially Sherman, would have supported him militarily.

      But I needed a reasonably plausible 'what if' for a fictitious but largish campaign,

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  7. Hello Archduke.

    Your latest post, "Holding Action", produces a "Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist" response when trying to connect to it. This is a shame as it looks really interesting! Can you repost?

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    1. I've reposted it. Not everyone has had that trouble, but I'm wondering if it might have been a timing thing. I prematurely hit the 'Publish' button at one point...

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