Saturday, December 12, 2015

No Housing Shortage Here...


Continuing on with my stock-take of my houses, buildings and assorted edifices. I thought I might as well conclude with my Hornby Railway buildings, with a few extras thrown in.

In the foreground, plastic house, stables or garage, and a small
factory.  The last was bought at a model railway show; the others second
hand at a bring and buy.

Hornby Railway Station - the smaller one! A little
remedial work needed on the chimney and the awning.

These buildings have been laid out simply to add interest
 to the pictures.  The telegraph poles I got from a assortment of
model railway accessories going second hand.
The black strip in the above picture is some kind of vinyl or fake leather intended to represent Macadamised road.  I think a drybrush of grey, and maybe a dashed median line might improve its look.  I don't actually have much of this anyhow...
The town's CBD.  Administration building, bank, and assorted
shops around a paved square.
This church was about to be deep-sixed, and the original steeple
was certainly beyond repair.  The crenellations that replaced it
were given a coat of sand.

This church, even after 40 years, still has its steepl, though
it is getting a bit worse for wear.

This plastic station was another Bring-n-buy score.
 It did not come with a platform though, and looked wrong without it.
The platform is balsa overlaid with printed paving.
 The railway station in these pictures answered a need for something a bit smaller and bucolic than the other railway station pictured earlier.   The printed paving was part of my small store of down-loaded cobbles/brick/masonry/paving patterns that I print out when I feel the requirement.
The street entrance to the station with its loading ramp/walkway.

Over a thick sheet of balsa I laid a thinner sheet with a small overlap
then glued the paving paper over all.  The ramps are separate.
The raised platform area sans station.

Small station with the ticket office and platform, Hornby
water tower, and small goods loading and despatch office.
At the extreme right is a little coal office.

These black and white timber and plaster houses were
designed to be constructed as one unit.  See text.
 The above pictures show examples of the so-called 'Tudor' timber and plaster buildings that I rather like.  Though the black and white was peculiar to Britain, I gather (the continent tending to dark browns and yellows), I tend not to worry about such niceties.  The background unit I bought second hand as is and have left it that way.  But the one I bought many decades ago, I wanted to be two separate buildings, and so I constructed them. That meant adding new walls where they would have joined.  No problem there.  I just shapes some white-enough card stock and drew on the timbering with marker pen.  The brickwork around the base was coloured with marker pen, and then brickwork drawn over it with fine black ballpoint pen.  The difference between that and the original is barely noticeable.





 The smallest 'Tudor' house in the foreground grew from my discovery the other day that I had an extra wall.  So I made another, very small, house.  I'm not sure the paving pattern really 'works' as roofing slates.  The windows and doors were drawn in.  In the pic below, two of the houses 'rubbled'. The orinigal buildings fit over the top.  I have done this with just one other of my buildings.
 This is it - some sort of municipal office or administration building - the Grunterhof, or Rathaus...
Municipal Rathaus in peacetime...

...a pile of rubble in war.
Shop district.

I don't know where the middle one came from, but I bought it new and assembled it.  I had hoped to make in 3 separate sections, but that proved impractical.  So it stayed rather neglected and in rather poor shape until a quick refurb a couple of weeks or so back.  The colourful building on the right I got second hand in very sorry condition.  I coloured the plaster a light orange, though I think light yellow would have been better, and touched up the worn bits with marker pen.  The place still manages to look run down...

The larger, small-town or suburban railway station, signal box and some sort of power generator thingy by way of accessory.


Office buildings.
I'll close with a few other inconsequential pics...




.......



22 comments:

  1. Nice town. Can I buy property there?

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    1. I thought it would be nice to do a little, though hasty, bit of town planning... :-)

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  2. Some great scenic additions

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    1. The accessories do add a little something, don't they?

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  3. Kick arse post mate. Lots off lovely stuff in here.

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    1. Until recently, I never felt I quite had enough buildings...

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  4. An impressive collection of buildings , I made up one of those churches about 40 years ago , Tony

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    1. My steepled church I built I think in 1974. The other I acquired maybe 8 or 10 years ago second hand, in very poor condition.

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  5. Replies
    1. You know, it wasn't until I set these things out for this posting that I realised it would make quite a substantial urban area for a war game.

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  6. Lovely post Ion, I had that card church but over time the steeple ended up looking like it had been sucked!. I like your conversion of the one with the tower. I had the Tudor house too but gave it to my son to play with when he was little.
    Thanks for posting this.
    Paul.

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    1. Cheers, Paul. The steeple is a bit delicate, that's for sure. I made mine detachable for ease of staorage, but that hasn't done it any good. Some reinforcing called for, methinks.

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks, Phil! Although it was shoved together for inventory purposes, I did try to make it look like something for this posting.

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  8. A very impressive collection of buildings. Nice bit of work on the railway platform.

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    1. Thanks, Conrad. Took a while to get around to it, but around to it I eventually got!

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  9. That is an mpressive collection of buildings!

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    1. Enough for some serious street fighting, perhaps?

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  10. An impressive collection of (mainly) Superquick card kits you have there. Your Rathaus was originally a Police Station, so its new designation is in keeping.

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    1. :-) I had forgotten that. But it has a kind of 'town hall' look that I want.

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  11. Replies
    1. Even then I forgot a couple of farm buildings... Thanks, Francis.

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